KY Methamphetamine Charges & Defense

The possession, manufacture, or sale of methamphetamine — also known as crystal meth or simply meth — without a prescription is illegal, but meth use continues to grow in Kentucky.

State law enforcement officials work diligently to track down meth users, including persons who buy the legal ingredients for meth and then use those ingredients in “meth labs” to create meth for their own use or for sale.

If you are charged with a meth-related crime, you will need the services of a defense attorney who is familiar with Kentucky’s laws on meth possession, manufacture, and sale. Dan Carman has practiced law in Kentucky for years, and also served as in-house counsel for an infantry battalion when he was deployed to Iraq as a U.S. Marine. Dan has defended Kentucky clients against drug charges, and he is ready to defend you.

Meth Use in Kentucky

Meth use in Kentucky continues to grow. In 2007 and 2008, meth cases represented 6 percent of the total drug cases in Kentucky. In 2009, it had risen to 9 percent, and to 11 percent by 2010. Discovery of meth labs by Kentucky law enforcement rose from a total of 428 in 2008 to nearly 1100 in 2010.

Meth Possession

If you are found to be in possession of any amount of meth, you face first degree possession of controlled substance charges, and you should be defended by an attorney familiar with Kentucky’s laws concerning illegal drug possession.

Precursor Possession

If you are found to be in possession of a drug product or combination of drug products with the intent to use the drug as a “precursor” in the manufacture of meth, or if you are found to have unlawfully “distributed” a meth precursor, you can be charged with a Class D felony for a first-time offense, and a Class C felony if this is your second or subsequent offense. (Precursor products include cold remedies containing pseudoephedrine, such as Claritin-D and Sudafed, and anhydrous ammonia and/or ammonia nitrate.) You should seek the services of a defense attorney who is familiar with Kentucky’s laws on possession and distribution of “precursor” drug products.

Child Endangerment

Meth is dangerously addictive, but the manufacture of meth is also a dangerous process, and children who happen to be in the area where meth is being manufactured can face injury or death through explosion, fire, inhalation of toxic fumes, or accidental consumption of the meth. You can be charged with Class D controlled substance endangerment of a child in the fourth degree if that child happens to be in the area of meth manufacture but is not actually injured in the manufacturing process. If you are charged with a Class D felony, you should seek defense by an attorney familiar with Kentucky’s laws on controlled substance endangerment of a child.

Meth Trafficking

If you are found to have trafficked in meth in any fashion, including distributing, dispensing, selling, transferring, or possessing with the intent to distribute, dispense, or sell, the charges you face will depend on the amount of meth you were found to have trafficked and the number of times you have been charged with the offense of trafficking, and you should seek the services of a defense attorney who is familiar with Kentucky’s trafficking laws.

Deferred Prosecution Program

If this is your first or second offense related to meth, you may be eligible for participation in a deferred prosecution program. You should seek the services of a Kentucky defense attorney who is familiar with Kentucky’s laws on deferred prosecution. Dan Carman has built relationships within the legal community and with local prosecutors that are helpful in securing a positive outcome for his clients. These relationships have allowed him to closely analyze evidence and to discuss alternatives with prosecutors.

You Need Dan Carman

If you have been charged with any offense related to methamphetamine, a phone call to Dan Carman should be your next step. He takes defense against meth charges seriously, knows what it means for you and your family, and he will fight for you. Contact him by phone at (859) 838-1415 or by filling out the online form.