Cases We Handle

If you or a loved one has been charged with a crime, or you have learned of a criminal investigation that may lead to an arrest, these are probably very difficult times for you. Your liberty and future or that of your family member is at risk. With a criminal conviction may come months or years of jail, the loss of a job, difficulty in finding another job, being unable to support a family, the loss of a driver’s license, registry on a sex offender’s list and time lost with loved ones that can’t be replaced.

Dan Carman helps clients facing a wide range of criminal charges, including:

  • Abuse: Kentucky law protects children and those who have severe physical or mental limitations.
  • A person who may shelter, relieve or assist the principal after the crime has already been committed. This help may be financial, material or even the emotional support of the principal.
  • Animal Cruelty: The judge or jury must decide if the defendant’s act was intentional or done knowingly.
  • Arson: Intentionally starting a fire is treated very seriously because of the dangers a fire can present to building occupants and firefighters trying to put out the blaze.
  • Assault: This is unwanted physical contact of another resulting in a physical injury or intended to result in a physical injury.
  • Bail Jumping: A defendant is trusted to appear in court after posting bail. Failure to do so is a crime.
  • Bribery: It’s a crime for a public official to solicit or accept a bribe.
  • Burglary: Entering a building or property with the intent of committing a crime.
  • Car Theft: Often committed by those seeking money to support a drug habit.
  • Child Pornography – Possession, Distribution, etc.: Depending on the circumstances ir can be a federal crime with serious consequences.
  • Cocaine: Different types of the drug, in addition to the amount of the drug, can result in different penalties as can any prior convictions.
  • Controlled Substance: There is a wide range of illegal drugs and state and/or federal laws may be involved.
  • Counterfeiting: Creating, distributing or using counterfeit bills is a federal offense.
  • Credit Card Fraud: Obtaining something of value through deception by using a credit or debit card
  • Disorderly Conduct: Includes fighting, threatening and refusal to obey an official order to disperse.
  • Domestic Abuse: These charges can involve couples that are married or not.
  • Drugs – Possession, Distribution, etc.: Willfully possessing an illegal controlled substance means the drugs are in your custody and under your control, which could mean on your person, in your car or in your home. The charges vary, depending on the substances in your possession and the amount.
  • Drug Conspiracy: This can include an agreement between people and taking actions related to illegal drugs.
  • DUI: If your vehicle is stopped, a police officer can use a number of techniques to decide if your driving is impaired by drugs or alcohol. You can refuse to take a Breathalyzer test, but there are consequences to a refusal, because under the law the fact you’re driving on a public road is viewed as an implied consent to such tests. A DUI conviction could mean the loss of a job and far more expensive auto insurance. Illegal impairment can be caused by alcohol, over-the-counter, prescription or illegal drugs.
  • Expungement: Misdemeanor and certain Felony convictions may be removed from the record.
  • Felonies: These are the most serious crimes, with possible sentences of from one to fifty years. Under Kentucky law, there is no statute of limitation for felonies, so charges could be brought many years after the alleged crime took place. If the person being charged is supporting a family, a lengthy sentence is likely to be a severe financial and emotional blow to the family.
  • Firearm and Weapons Offenses: Though citizens have a constitutional right to bear arms, that right can be limited and regulated by the states. Those who violate Kentucky law by committing a crime while using a firearm face severe consequences, including possible heavy fines and long prison sentences. Federal laws may also apply.
  • Forgery: This covers creating, changing or the publication of a written instrument without having the owner’s knowledge or consent, with the intent to defraud.
  • Fraud: Can cover scams such as home improvements that are paid for but not done; obtaining goods, services or cash with a stolen credit card; or using false statements as part of a bankruptcy filing.
  • Gang Recruitment: Given the dangers criminal gangs may present, it’s a crime to recruit members.
  • Harassment: This may include stalking, hate crimes and cyberbullying and anything designed to annoy, provoke, threaten or cause emotional distress.
  • Homicide: Occurs when one person causes the death of another. It covers murder, different degrees of manslaughter and reckless homicide.
  • Healthcare Fraud: Inventing medical bills or “padding” actual bills with medical products or services not actually provided can be a state or federal crime.
  • Hit and Run: Not stopping after a vehicle accident is a crime.
  • Heroin Charges: Heroin-related charges can result in many years behind bars.
  • Identity Theft: Using stolen personal identification information and/or impersonating another to perpetrate fraud is a crime.
  • Juvenile Matters: Crimes by teenagers are normally the result of very bad decisions, often fueled by drug or alcohol use.
  • Kidnapping: Simple situations where someone is being held against their will can result in kidnapping charges. It need not be a complex scheme to extort large amounts of money.
  • Manslaughter: These charges can occur when someone was killed by the actions of another.
  • Marijuana: It’s a crime to possess any amount of marijuana in Kentucky. A charge of trafficking marijuana can result in a serious jail sentence.
  • Methamphetamine: Possession and distribution of this illegal drug is a crime.
  • Criminal Mischief: This crime often involves vandalism.
  • Misdemeanors: These are considered less serious crimes where a convicted defendant can spend up to 12 months in jail, pay a fine or both. There are different classes of misdemeanors and, depending on the charge and the circumstances, a conviction may be later cleared from the records, or expunged. Often as part of a plea bargain of a felony, a defendant may plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge in exchange for the felony charge being dropped.
  • Murder: This crime is the intentional, unlawful taking of another person’s life.
  • Nonsupport and Flagrant Nonsupport: Parents have a legal obligation to financially support their children. Failing to do so may result in criminal charges.
  • Obstruction of Justice: A crime against the administration of justice and government functioning.
  • Official Misconduct: This covers public officials who work for the government, whether by appointment or election.
  • Opiate-Related Criminal Charges: Criminal charges related to opioids (legal and illegal drugs that act on opioid receptors in the brain to dull pain and produce a high)
  • Perjury: This covers lying under oath, whether verbally or in writing.
  • Police Encounters: This is your interaction with the police
  • Possession of Firearm: Under Kentucky law, a convicted felon can’t legally possess a firearm.
  • Prescription Drugs: Selling your prescription drugs, or those of others, is illegal.
  • Probation Violations: Probation is a way to stay out of prison. Violating its terms can result in going to prison.
  • Prostitution: The sex trade often involves the trafficking of undocumented immigrants, children and drug use.
  • Protective Orders: Legal orders that involve threat, stalking, assault or violence, but the situation is not handled by the criminal justice system unless an existing order is violated.
  • Racketeering/RICO Violations: A racket is a scheme, trick, illegal business or activity, and the activity is called racketeering. This can involve relatively simple crimes, or conspiracies crossing state or national borders.
  • Rape: Non-consensual sexual intercourse is illegal. The most serious charges involve force or when the victim is not capable of consent or younger than 12 years old.
  • Resisting Arrest: Taking victims intended to prevent or delay an arrest could lead to this charge.
  • Restraining Orders: Kentucky emergency protective orders (EPO) and domestic violence orders (DVO) are intended to protect from harm a family member or someone with whom you have a relationship. If such an order is in place and there is probable cause you violated it, you may be arrested. Both the accuser and the accused have rights that are considered in these situations.
  • Robbery: This is a type of theft that involves force or the threat of it. It’s a felony under Kentucky law.
  • Sexual Offenses: These cover sexual conduct prohibited by state law, including rape, Sodomy, sexual abuse, sexual misconduct and indecent exposure.
  • Terroristic Threatening: It’s illegal under state and federal law to threaten to commit a crime that would reasonably result in death, terror, serious injury or serious physical property damage.
  • Theft: Taking someone else’s property or obtaining services without payment is illegal and can be a misdemeanor or a felony.
  • Traffic Offenses: Admitting guilt to traffic violations and speeding tickets not only results in paying fines, but could also end up in a suspended license and higher insurance premiums.
  • Trespassing: Involves knowingly entering or remaining unlawfully in a dwelling, building or other real property.
  • Underage DUI: Those who are younger than the legal drinking age, 21, can be charged with this crime even when a small level of alcohol is detected in the person’s body.
  • Violent Crimes: These are crimes involving force or physical injuries to another person, but depending on the situation, just the threat of injury to another may result in the charge of a violent crime. These charges include allegations of crimes against a person, not property. How serious they are is normally decided by the degree of physical harm to the victim. This degree increases if a weapon is used.
  • Weapons Charges: Those violating firearms restrictions or perpetrating a crime while using a weapon face severe penalties, including large fines and long prison sentences.
  • Writ of Habeas Corpus: Many legal terms are Latin phrases, and this important filing in criminal cases is one of them. It translates to “you should have the body.”
  • These are just some of the types cases we handle. The experienced Kentucky criminal defense attorney Dan Carman appreciates how serious your situation is, and we provide aggressive representation for those facing criminal investigations and charges. We know the criminal justice system, the players, when a plea bargain may be your best option and when a trial may be appropriate in your case.

    If you have been arrested or believe you’re under a criminal investigation, you need of the services of a criminal defense attorney. Contact our attorneys for a free initial consultation by calling 859-685-1055 or by filling out this online form. We can discuss your situation, your options and the best ways to protect your rights, your liberty and the future of you and your family.